Use your retirement accounts (401(k) or IRA) to invest in your business without having to pay early withdrawal penalties or taxes.  If you still need more money, this can be used in combination with a SBA loan.  The investment into your business may be enough that no collateral is required.  Even if collateral would normally be required, an alternative such as a payment reserve and be utilized.  Learn more about 401K business financing.
Whitney Johnson is a leading thinker on driving innovation via personal disruption and cofounder of Clayton Christensen's investment firm. She is a regular contributor for Harvard Business Review and LinkedIn, and the author of Disrupt Yourself, which Publisher's Weekly called "superb, savvy, wise." Whitney also speaks and consults with Fortune 100 Companies. Recently, her work was recognized by the Thinkers50, which named her as a finalist for the 2013 Future Thinker Award. You can find her at whitneyjohnson.com.

Getting money in advance of doing any business is called “mobilization capital.” This means you are looking for capital to help start a business and don’t have customers yet. This is also known as unsecured lending and is typically very difficult to secure. Your best bet in these situations is to try and raise seed capital investment aka friends and family investors. If your hot idea is really as good as you think, you should be able to find friends to join up and start up a company.
Online business lenders are a relatively new option, and they might provide more choice than you can find locally. You might also find it easier to get approved – these lenders are more interested in funding loans and growing than conservative banks and credit unions. Online lenders might also move faster than traditional lenders. That said, they’re not looking to lose money, so the loan still needs to make sense.
In addition to building a relationship with the loan officer, you want to find out what exactly they need to see in your business plan. Go in with your plan already written and numbers in your head so you can confidently and intelligently discuss your business model, and ask the loan officer what specifically they want to see from a business plan. Take the time to revise your current business plan to match what the loan officer wants before you go back to the bank for your actual pitch.
Small business line of credit. Under a small business line of credit, your business can access funds from the lender as needed. There will be a cap on the amount of funds accessible (e.g., $100,000) but a line of credit is useful for managing a company’s cash flow and unexpected expenses. There will typically be a fee for setting up the line of credit, but you don’t get charged interest until you actually draw down the funds. Interest is typically paid monthly and the principal drawn down on the line is often amortized over years. However, most lines of credit require renewal annually, which may require an additional fee. If the line is not renewed, you will be required to pay it in full at that time.

You can arrange to borrow from ordinary commercial banks or credit unions for your new venture. According to the Small Business Administration (SBA), new franchise owners have a higher tendency to borrow from commercial banks than new business owners. Lenders prefer advancing cash to new franchises over other new businesses since they already have trust in the brand and business model of the business being funded.

For the limited time beginning with applications dated July 9, 2018, and ending with applications dated on or before December 31, 2018, the interest rate on cash advances and purchases made on your Business Advantage Credit Line account approved for not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 is a fixed introductory interest rate of 2.99% for the first 12 billing cycles from the date your Credit Line account is opened. After that, the interest rate will be a market competitive variable interest rate, based on the Prime Rate, your creditworthiness, your business relationship with Bank of America, and the approved amount for your Credit Line account. Excludes secured loans and secured lines of credit, and unsecured term loans. Origination fee of $150. Annual fee of $150 is waived for the first year of your Credit Line account, and assessed annually thereafter. Enroll in Autopay to make payments on your Credit Line account within 90 days from date it is opened and get a $50 credit to your Credit Line account. The $50 credit will be applied to the account after the origination fee is posted. Other restrictions may apply. Subject to credit approval.
An investor looks for a more high-risk opportunity to get a higher reward and will put their money in established businesses that have the potential for high growth. Investors generally expect to be involved in the business in the form of a seat on the board of directors or some other role in which they have a say in how the business is managed. For the most part, investors want to get in on a company while it is in its early growth stage, and they get out once the business has reached a certain level of growth.
To comfortably repay your loan each month, your total income should be at least 1.25 times your total expenses, including your new repayment amount, Darden says. For example, if your business’s income is $10,000 a month and you have $7,000 worth of expenses including rent, payroll, inventory, etc., the most you can comfortably afford is $1,000 a month in loan repayments. You can use Nerdwallet’s business loan calculator to determine your loan’s affordability.
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